Tag Archives: thanksgiving

Our Thanksgiving

Ok, so we didn’t watch the parade and we didn’t put together a jigsaw puzzle.  And I cooked a modest traditional Thanksgiving feast…without the stuffing.  What can I say, I was craving the after-Thanksgiving turkey sandwiches and looking forward to the other usual leftovers we could eat for the entire next week.  I admit that since I’ve been busy with school and work, I’ve kind of missed cooking.  But mostly, I wanted to have the opportunity to spend quality time with each of the girls and have them cook with me.

Hayley loves corn and asked to help me with the corn casserole.  She enjoyed chopping the onion with the food chopper until it made her “cry.”  She also helped me make the pumpkin pie filling.  I invited Jenna to help me make the potato-chive monkey bread rolls.  She was fascinated when she saw how the dough had risen and I explained to her the process.  Skye helped me with the pie crust and the mashed potatoes, which is a favorite of hers.

Hayley asked me last week whether we were going to shoot a turkey, buy a turkey, or just have chicken.  She loves chicken.  According to her, however, turkey does NOT taste just like chicken as I told her.  Turkey is “kind of good and kind of gross.”  The girls were a bit disgusted at first by the uncooked bird, especially when I animated it for them.  Then they were intrigued by it and Skye wondered where all the organs were.  She had studied the body systems last year in school.  They were not particularly excited about eating the gravy when they discovered it actually came from the turkey drippings.

We all sat together in the evening to play Uno H2O.  It’s the waterproof Uno card game.  I don’t know why we purchased waterproof cards.  Perhaps we could use them at the beach or the pool.  All the girls were quick to understand the game and had no trouble playing independently.  They got a little competitive, but there were no tears.  Everyone really seemed to have a good time.  I think it was a great day spent together.

Kirsten: Thanksgiving

Ah, there are so many things to be thankful for. I am most thankful for my wonderful family. I love those days that neither Brent nor I are working and we can spend time together. We have such a great time together, and usually we end up going to the bookstore, library, coffee shop, or to the coast (when it’s not too cold) to hang out, talk, and read. Brent is more than my best friend, and he keeps me sane.

Our daughters are so wonderful. They light up my life and truly make parenting rewarding. Skye, Jenna, and Hayley each have such unique personalities, and our little family would certainly not be complete without each of them. I’m thankful for all the relationships I have with my family and friends. I only wish I could see everyone more often. The time passes too quickly.

I’m grateful for the opportunity for learning and growth, and for the lessons that come from defeat. It is what we aspire to be that colors our characters–and it is our trying, not just our succeeding, which ennobles them. The best lessons are usually the hardest; and defeat often counts among these latter. The only true defeat lies in letting defeat win. Continue reading Kirsten: Thanksgiving

Brent: Thanksgiving

I like St. Patrick’s Day because it’s a time to drink beer, pinch people and have a parade. I don’t like most holidays because they’re all about food and getting stuff. Aren’t we fat enough already? And don’t we have enough crap stuffed inside our about-to-be-foreclosed McMansions?

Seriously, the traditions of Thanksgiving, Christmas, Halloween, Easter, Valentine’s Day and wedding anniversaries are for stupid people and invented by marketers. I’d rather not.

Does that make me a curmudgeon? Getting together with family is wonderful. So is football. But I could do without the feast.

I’ve created a budget, now what?

Once youve estimated your own budget, you might start looking at homes within your price range. You might even look at a couple of homes in your price range, but decide that youre not ready to spend that much. Thats fine. The important thing is to get a good budget, I recommend using this budget app. After that, if youre still not ready to buy a house, you can buy an apartment (if you have a job and dont have to commute to work). Thats a much cheaper and, in some cases, a much better choice than buying a house. If you have the resources, by all means buy a house. The sooner youre able to do this, the better.

Also, once youre in a house, youll notice that things arent very different from how they were in your previous apartment or town house. Youll have lots of furniture in your new home that youd never have in your old place. That, again, is a good sign that your home is a good investment. I’ll continue to update this thread as I discover new info and I make updates to this guide, so if you find information that would help you, please let me know. If youre ready to buy a house, buy one. You will see better things in a house. But, when you get it, don’t sell it, unless you have the money to make up for the loss in value.

As for the rules:

If you are considering buying in the suburbs, use these rules.

The first rule is that you can’t have a house in the suburbs and an apartment in the city. You’ve got to sell both the suburban house and the apartment. This is easy to understand. Buy the house and rent it out for more money. This is what I do. Buy a house and rent it out. And when you sell the house, you make the money back by renting the place out. The second rule is to use the city’s tax code. If you sell a house, you can’t use that money to buy another house and then use the money to buy an apartment. If you do this, you won’t be able to sell your house and go to the city for the rent. Instead, you’ve got to use the tax code to get rid of your house and buy the apartment in the city. There are exceptions, such as if you’re going to be staying there, you can keep your rental. If you have a family member living there, then that’s fine.

The third rule is that you’ll need to pay taxes. Once you sell your house, you’ll have to pay taxes on the money you make. You’ll pay taxes on the money you make before you sell the house. Your tax bill depends on whether you’ve paid income tax or sales tax on your income. You’ll be taxed on all the money you make after you sell your house.

You’re probably wondering, “If I’m buying my first home, then what are the different steps I should take?” There are actually three separate steps to getting a home if you’re buying a first home.

You need to put in a down payment this is the amount of money you need to pay the lender. This includes the bank’s fee for providing you with the down payment, the broker’s fee, and the